Nurses and Nurse Practitioners of BC Free Membership!
NNPBC is a not for profit society registered in the province of British Columbia in September, 2018

Policy & Advocacy: Health Awareness / Nursing Leadership

World Multiple Sclerosis Day: May 30, 2019

Multiple Sclerosis is an autoimmune disease of the central nervous system, diagnosed most often in adults 20-49. Symptoms range from fatigue and tiredness, to pain and issues with cognition. Other functions such as vision and urinary problems can arise. In more severe cases, an individual’s health can be severely impacted, reducing the ability to live independently. This unpredictable disease does not cause death, and individuals can live a full lifespan, but their health and well-being is often negatively impacted by the disease. In Canada, MS is diagnosed in 1 in every 385 adults.

The Multiple Sclerosis Society of Canada and the MS International Federation show leadership by supporting those living with MS how to live well-rounded and productive lives. At NNPBC we know that nurses are at the forefront of caring for those who live with MS.

Resources:


X

Where do you work?

I am a Registered Nurse with a critical care background. I have recently added acute care and long-term care to my job. I made the jump from strictly critical care in an attempt to develop a well-rounded understanding of the various patient demographics in my community. My goal for this was to support a local home care company I run with my brother. Needless to say this has me immersed in the area of home care nursing.
X

What do you love most about nursing?

What I love most about nursing is the opportunity to provide support and reassurance to people in some of the most vulnerable and uncertain moments of their lives. It is a privilege to be trusted to do so, and I take great pride in this aspect of my job.
X

Where do you see nursing in the next five years?

I have spent a lot of time in a workplace that experiences regular overcrowding, a lack of resources, and inadequate staffing levels. I began to realize that the future of nursing is really progressing towards health care delivered within the home. This shift must occur within our pressured health care system in order to accommodate our aging population with increasing comorbidities, coupled with a lack of licensed facilities and hospitals. As a nurse, I hope to be an effective advocate in facilitating this shift and improve the quality standards in patient centered care.
X

Because of nursing...

I get the privilege of helping. I have a passion for my profession, and I will be a champion for change.
X

Where do you work?

I have been a registered nurse for 39 years in a variety of settings, including oncology, neurosurgery, long term care (both geriatrics and complex care), rural hospitals, med-surgery, remote fly-in nursing stations, palliative care, teaching, and most recently, homecare.
X

What do you love most about nursing?

What I love most about nursing is the ongoing opportunity to make a difference in people’s lives, both to patients at a time when they might be feeling the most uncomfortable, and to my colleagues who may be feeling overwhelmed, unsure or unhappy. Laughter, guidance and team spirit go a long way to foster a workplace that will ultimately give even better care because the nurses feel safe and supported!
X

Where do you see nursing in the next five years?

What I trust in nursing is the caliber of nursing education that is offered now. The young nurses have such a wealth of basic knowledge, something I only acquired through years of experience. I have often wished I could retake the initial nursing education, but the next best thing is to have young nurses to work with on the team! I learn so much from them!
X

Because of nursing...

I get to work alongside my children! I’m blessed by their personalities, their individual talents and their special interests and have been recently was gifted with my first granddaughter. If there is any time left over, I enjoy working with fibre- knitting, quilting and cross stitching.